Home > Age of Conan, Gear > Comparison of priest armor sets

Comparison of priest armor sets

Actually, the title of this post is a bit of a lie. It isn’t really about all priest sets; I’m heavily biased in favor of ToSses, so I’m really only interested in ToS gear. I included PoM gear in the comparisons here since both classes can mostly use the same sets anyway. As for the smelly bear handlers, screw them and their medium armor ๐Ÿ˜›

The roots of this post go back to my fascination with the sudden wealth of gear options when Khitai was released. Before that, everything was so simple; you got your T2 gear and that was the best for everything (except maybe PvP, but I didn’t do PvP so that didn’t matter to me). Well, or T3 gear, but by the time the expansion released, we weren’t doing alt T3 raids yet, so I couldn’t really get T3 gear for my ToS. Anyway, once the expansion was released, we now had really meaningful gear choices, perhaps for the first time in the history of the game. You could get faction gear that focused on damage, or on healing, or on survivability, etc.

We have a rough idea of how the developers put stats on the gear. It involves getting totally drunk then writing stuff on a blackboard and throwing darts at it. Each item has a certain “budget”, and each attribute has a certain cost; so, the more of that attribute you put on the item, the less of the item’s budget is left for other attributes. Thus, if they put more wisdom or magic damage on a set, there’s less of the budget left for things such as heal rating, constitution, etc. The overall size of the budget depends on the tier of the item: T4 raid items have a bigger budget than T3 ones; old-world dungeon blues have a bigger budget than world-drop blues; etc.

So choosing attributes inevitably involves tradeoffs. For example, we know that the Scarlet Circle set sacrifices heal rating to get more magic damage, whereas with the Children of Yag-Kosha set it’s just the other way around. The Scholars of Cheng-Ho set sacrifices a sizeable chunk of its budget for immunity, the Hyrkanian set for constitution, and the Yellow Priest set has a good balance between heal rating and magic damage but it sacrifices some constitution to make space for extra critigation.

For the purposes of this post, I was interested in tradeoffs between magic damage (including the damage that comes from wisdom, where each point of wisdom gives you 0.6 magic damage) and heal rating. In addition to using “pure” sets (i.e. all 8 armor pieces from the same set), you can achieve interesting intermediate tradeoffs by mixing the parts from several different sets. This can be illustrated nicely on a chart, where each such set of armor is represented by a point whose x-coordinate tells you the heal rating and the y-coordinate tells you the magic damage. Or, in other words, you can take each such point to mean that if you want to have at least x heal rating, then the maximum amount of magic damage you can achieve will be y.

Needless to say, many of the mixed sets obtained in this way are decidedly weird and it wouldn’t necessarily be a good idea to wear them — after all, we ignored all other attributes when making this analysis. So this whole post is more for fun than for any useful purpose.

In any case, here’s the chart, but click on it to see the larger version:

The big yellow ♦ symbols show the “pure” sets. You can see all the sets without heal rating stacked on the left; that’s mostly the pre-expansion sets, though a couple of them are more recent as well. You can see how the magic damage increases as you move from old epic Kheshatta sets (Empyeral for ToSses, Resplendent for PoMs), old-world dungeon sets (Skyshear for ToSses, Exaltate’s for PoMs) through the T1, T2 and T3 sets and finally get to the Erlik DPS set from T3.5, which is a bit unusual in that it has absolutely no heal rating even though it was released well after the expansion.

On the other extreme you have the Nebulous set from House of Crom, a blue set with plenty of heal rating but no magic damage whatsoever. The other House of Crom priest light set, Unutterable, is extremist in the opposite sense, having a shitload of magic damage (for a blue set) but no heal rating. (You don’t see it on the chart but the same thing is true for HP: the Nebulous set has plenty of it, Unutterable has none.)

The various Khitai faction sets and T4 raid sets are in the upper right part of the chart, as they contain both magic damage and heal rating, though in varying proportions.

The red dots show us what tradeoffs between heal rating and magic damage can be achieved by mixing and matching the five faction purple sets (Scarlet Circle, Yellow Priests, Hyrkanians, Scholars, and Children). You can see that no such mixed set will give you more heal rating than the Children full set. On the other extreme, the Scarlet Circle set gives you almost the biggest amount of magic damage, but you can actually increase both magic damage and heal rating a bit by replacing the gloves with those from the Yellow Priest set.

The ♦ symbols for the other pure faction sets are below the red line of mixed sets because they spend a part of their budget on other things: Yellow Priests have critigation, Hyrkanians have HP and Scholars have immunity.

In T4, we have two light sets for priests: Dragon King focuses on damage and Thousand Blossoms focuses on healing. The dark blue dots show us the tradeoffs possible by mixing them. You can see that they are all quite a bit better than what you can get by using the faction sets. The light blue dots show us the tradeoffs possible by allowing both the T4 items and faction purples, but there are very few situations where this improves upon the results of the purely-T4 mixtures. No mixed set gives you more heal rating than the pure Thousand Blossoms set. On the DPS side, you can slightly increase the magic damage by taking the Dragon King set and replacing the shoulders and wrists with those from the Scarlet Circle set.

The green dots show us the tradeoffs that can be obtained by mixing the two T3.5 sets (Erlik and Revelations). The chart is a bit misleading here because it shows just magic damage and heal rating, which makes these two sets (and what you can get by mixing them) seem much worse than faction sets; but they have their advantages as well — looking at the other attributes, you could say that the Revelations set combines the heal rating of the Children set with the hit, critical and critical damage rating of the Scarlet Circle set, with a bigger HP and mana pool than either of them.

Finally, the orange dots show us the tradeoffs between the two House of Crom blue sets. I suspect that Funcom deliberately made many of those blue sets extreme in one way or another (e.g. for soldiers, you have the Atlantean set with a shitload of HP but no DPS, and the Beyond set with a shitload of DPS but no HP), because you can then obtain any intermediate combination of attributes simply by mixing the parts of two such “extremist” sets. We can see that if you don’t care about healing (and your own HP), the Unutterable set will give you more magic damage than even many purple sets; and on the other hand you could mix in a few Nebulous pieces and reach more than 500 heal rating without dropping below the magic damage of old-world blue sets.

For the sake of completeness, here’s a table with stats of the various sets shown here:

Set

Heal Rtg

Magic Damage

Armor

Critigation

HP

Mana

Nat Mana Regen

Hate Dec Rtg

Hit Rtg

Crit Rtg

Crit Dmg Rtg

Other

Thousand Blossoms (T4)

2465

403.2

3679

1921

3168

3803

95.2

95

280

247

256

*

Dragon King (T4)

1195

706.2

3679

1921

2792

2721

63.5

120

274

244

290

Erlik (T3.5)

557.4

3679

1921

2960

3113

70.0

90

385

228

267

Revelations (T3.5)

1973

382.2

3679

1921

3248

3311

44.6

90

432

213

233

Children of Yag-Kosha

2012

404.0

3443

1883

2528

2807

72

120

96

130

*

Scarlet Circle

638

657.2

3443

1883

2504

756

17.6

440

220

268

Hyrkanians

1543

421.8

3443

1883

3200

2109

49.2

141

145

106

Yellow Priests of Yun

1379

523.8

3443

2339

2400

804

18.8

80

170

135

191

*

Scholars of Cheng-ho

1751

356.0

3443

1883

2464

3233

80

90

50

*

Nebulous

1316

2932

1460

2880

2850

82.8

122

192

*

Unutterable

543.0

2804

1460

2715

63.4

321

179

217

Sundered Skies (T3 ToS)

511.8

3652

3280

2984

80.0

110

221

105

189

Celestial Radiance (T3 PoM)

511.2

3652

3136

3203

84.9

133

222

90

185

*

Riftcaller (T2 ToS)

458.0

3607

3136

2704

70.5

91

206

90

171

Effulgent Devotion (T2 PoM)

456.8

3607

3008

2924

75.8

113

195

80

170

*

Cloudcleaver (T1 ToS)

406.0

3278

2976

2298

60.7

71

193

70

145

Illuminant Conviction (T1 PoM)

400.8

3278

2848

2486

66.7

96

179

65

144

*

Skyshear

296.0

2708

2328

1425

24.5

32

153

36

Exaltate

272.4

2708

2272

2162

46.6

41

30

Empyreal

177.6

2372

1848

888

20.7

328

*

Resplendent

228.6

2360

2384

1143

26.7

*

As usual, stat trickledowns (from wis, con etc.) have been taken into account, but stamina and stamina regen (from constitution) has been removed as PoMs and ToSses no longer have stamina since the sprint revamp. Holy/unholy protection from wisdom has likewise been removed.

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Categories: Age of Conan, Gear
  1. Sapiento
    October 31, 2012 at 16:16

    Very interesting chart, lots of food for thought.
    My first impression is: T3,5 sux: T3,5 healing set hes less healing AND less dps than yag-kosha (which has prot as added value), T3,5 DPS set has less dps than SC set (which hase some HR as added value). Maby Funcom went a bit over the top with theese two Khitai sets?

  2. October 31, 2012 at 21:03

    Well, as I tried to point out above, if you consider other stats besides magic damage and heal rating, the T3.5 healing set doesn’t look *that* bad any more.

    As for the the SC and Yag-Kosha sets, I don’t think they are over the top, rather that the T3.5 sets are under the top ๐Ÿ˜›

    I think Funcom’s idea for raid gear progression is to put more HP and hit rating on raid gear, which makes it more attractive (compared to dungeon gear) for raiding without making it too OP for dungeon fights.

  3. Lene
    November 2, 2012 at 11:32

    Hey.. I’ve been trying to figure out hit rating and how much I should have on. For example on soldiers, Will there be much difference in glancing hits if I have 15% Hit chance than 16% for example? And on what bosses would higher hit rating be usefull?

    Cool if you could do some math on that subject.

  4. November 3, 2012 at 08:50

    Well, my understanding is that each mob has a certain evade chance, and your hit bonus chance that you get from hit rating will work against the mob’s evade chance. As you go higher up in raid tiers, the mobs’ evade (and immunity) chance grows higher. IME you don’t particularly need to worry about hit rating until you get to T4 from Imp onwards, or to T3.5 (especially the Bat). I’m sure there would be some difference between 15% and 16% but I doubt it would be big enough that you’d notice.

    • Lene
      November 3, 2012 at 20:52

      What I’m thinking about is Glancing hits, which reduces your hit with 50% dmg.

      Example:

      [22:55:07] You crush The Devourer for 144. (Glancing)

      I wear dungeon gear and for me, the decision is, The fort helm with +45 Combat rating (15 str) or +40 hitrating from LL helm.

      Then there is the Scarlet circle cloak(hitrating) vs. HOC cloak with critical damage rating.

      Which combination of the helms/cloaks will produce the most hate?

  5. November 4, 2012 at 10:34

    Well, 45 combat rating is like 1.2 dps, which is pretty much negligible imo… I guess if the glancing hits occur often enough to bother you, it might be better to take more hit rating. If you wanted to be really sure, you’d have to analyze a huge amount of combat logs from fighting that particular mob to estimate the percentage of glancing hits at this or that level of hit rating.

    As for which combination will produce more hate — other things being equal, the combination with more damage (whether because of higher dps or fewer glancing hits or whatever) should produce more hate; but other things probably aren’t equal, e.g. if some of the gear has more hate increase rating on it, I’m not sure how exactly that affects hate. In general I don’t really see any practical way to measure this sort of things reliably, though I do remember that occasionally over the years some people in the forums have tried and even claimed to come up with numbers for the amount of hate generated by this or that (though I’m inclined to be skeptical of such numbers).

  1. January 5, 2013 at 18:18
  2. March 31, 2017 at 18:36

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