Home > Age of Conan, Gear, Vanity Gear > Old world-drop and dungeon sets

Old world-drop and dungeon sets

There is a large number of blue armor sets dropping from old-world content in the level 40-80 range. Probably the only reason to go out of your way to farm for them nowadays would be as vanity gear; in terms of stats, they simply aren’t that impressive (the below-80 sets because you will outlevel them too soon and the level 80 ones because you will get better gear in Khitai easily enough). But many of these sets are quite interesting as vanity armor, and you can even notice that many of the social armor sets for sale in the item shop are just slightly modified versions of these old blue sets. So I figured I’d make a post about them, partly because I like vanity gear and partly because of nostalgia for old content.



Skyshear (the ToS level 80 dungeon set).

World-drop sets

These sets drop mainly from bosses in open-world playfields; when you kill such a boss, you are pretty much guaranteed to get a green item, but there’s also a small chance that he’ll drop a blue item instead. On the other hand, if you go to the epic instance of the playfield, you’re guaranteed to get a blue item from each boss kill. Thus, people who explicitly want to farm for this sort of blue gear do it in the epic version of the playfields.

The loot tables of open-world bosses are fairly huge; besides armor they also have a chance of dropping various kinds of weapons, shields, etc., many of which are bind-on-equip (and most of which have rather unimpressive stats compared to dungeon drops). What exactly can drop from a boss depends on his level; IME each boss generally drops items that are up to 2 levels above or below him.

Besides open-world playfields, this sort of items also drop from bosses in the Oasis of Zaara, Frost Swamp and Imirian Ravine (which are scalable level 40-80 group dungeons; the level of the mobs adjusts to the level of the first player that enters the dungeon), and also from Attilius Mansion and Slaughterhouse Cellar (where you can choose between normal and epic mode when entering, similarly to an open-world playfield). They also have a small chance of appearing in the loot bag that’s created when a player is killed in PvP.

All this huge jumble of world-drop blue items includes 12 sets of armor in the level 40-69 range and 12 sets of armor in the level 70-80 range (in addition, there are various odd pieces of armor which don’t form sets, so they won’t concern us here). Thus, each of these sets actually exists in several versions for different levels; all these different-level versions look exactly the same, but the higher-level items of course have better stats.

Chests, heads, legs and hands are bind-on-pickup and are available in even-level versions (40, 42, …, 78, 80); shoulders, wrists, feet and belts are bind-on-equip and are available in odd-level versions (41, 43, …, 77, 79), and also for level 80, so that you can get the whole set at level 80 if you like.

People who want to farm the low-level (40-69) sets for vanity usually do so in the epic instance of Field of the Dead, in the Haunted Forest area in the southern part of the playfield. There are a lot of bosses there near to one another, so you can farm them very efficiently, and by the time you’ve killed them all, the first ones have already started respawning, so you can keep farming without delays for as long as you like.

To farm the high-level (70-80) sets, people usually go to the epic instance of Kheshatta. Occasionally people would farm the lions in the eastern part of the playfield, near Kalanthes’s camp; these bosses are level 75 or so, and drop armor in that range as well. If you specifically want level 80 versions, you have to go to the camps in the southwest of the playfield. The first few bosses in the Ghanatan area are level 78-80, so they have a chance of dropping level 80 armor, but they can also drop slightly lower-level versions; as you go further you reach the bat camps with level 81-82 bosses, which always drop level 80 armor.

Open-world bosses like these tend to be vulnerable to CCs, so it’s often perfectly possible for a decently-geared level 80 character to solo such a boss if he uses enough CCs (don’t forget the stun from double-tapping forward and melee hits!) and maybe a bit of kiting; but this is slow and people of course usually did this with a group (though it doesn’t have to be a full group). Most of these bosses are in tents surrounded by lots of trash, so the usual approach was to have one player aggro the mobs and kite them while another player then extracted the boss from this group and started fighting him. The trash would eventually reset and go back to the tent, at which point the kiter can go to the boss fight as well.

Level 80 dungeon sets

These sets are sometimes referred to as “T0” or “T0.5” sets, the idea being that they are naturally one step below T1 raid gear. In any case, they drop in the three original level 80 group dungeons: Atzel’s Fortress, Caravan Raiders’ Hideout, and Onyx Chambers. These were in fact the only level 80 group dungeons available at launch, if you don’t count the scalable ones mentioned earlier (Frost Swamp, Imirian Ravine, Oasis of Zaara).

There are again 12 sets here, but the loot tables aren’t all mixed together like they are for the world-drop sets. Instead, each boss has a smallish loot table consisting of maybe 5 or so specific items. So if you want to farm for a specific set, you should look up which bosses drop those items, and focus on farming those particular bosses. Many parts of these sets drop from rare bosses in Onyx Chambers, which makes farming these sets a major pain in the ass (not to mention very time-consuming).

See this forum post for a list of what drops where; this post for more about farming Onyx Chambers; and this excellent interactive map of Onyx Chambers. Many people complain that Onyx is confusing and easy to get lost in, but once you get used to it you see that it’s really fairly simple, and you can always know exactly where you are and how to get to where you want to go.

Various other things drop in these dungeons besides the above-mentioned twelve level 80 dungeon sets. Atzel’s Fortress contains a few odd bits of armor and incomplete sets (Mordec, Gunderland). Onyx contains a wide assortment of weapons, many of which are curiously class-specific by present-day standards. Although none of them has an explicit class constraint, their stats have been set up so that many of them are really only useful for one class; for example, there’s a mace with electrical damage (Windfury) to make sure that it’s useful only for a ToS but not for a PoM; there’s a staff with holy damage (Shadow’s Bane) to make sure that it’s useful only for a PoM, etc.

Additionally, various crafting recipes also drop in these dungeons; in particular, some of them drop culture armor recipes, and Brokk the Smith in Atzel’s Fortress drops several alchemy recipes (useful for crafting ingredients for T2/T3 crafted raid weapons). Of course, it’s very doubtful whether it’s worth the trouble to farm for these recipes in the current state of the economy.

Before 1.05, the level 80 world drop sets and level 80 dungeon sets were very similar in terms of stats, but since 1.05 they are very different; the world ones are utter crap, but the dungeon sets are actually still pretty decent. The only problem is that they take so much effort to farm; if you spend the same amount of time in Khitai, you’ll get much better gear in the process.

Set names

As mentioned above, there are 12 sets in each group; that is, twelve level 40-69 world drop sets, twelve level 70-80 world drop sets, and twelve level 80 dungeon sets. Although none of them have any explicit class constraints, it’s obvious that there is meant to be some sort of correspondence between the 12 character classes and the 12 sets in each group. Most of the time you can see that a particular set has been given stats with a particular class in mind, and usually its name is also in a certain (somewhat poetic) relationship to the class.

Class Level 40-69
world-drop set
Level 70-80
world-drop set
Level 80
dungeon set
Assassin

Twilight

Midnight

Widowdusk
Barbarian

Corybantic

Ravager’s

Goremonger’s
Bear Shaman

Wildsoul

Beastfury

Strifescar
Conqueror

Vindicator

Vanquisher’s

Warglory
Dark Templar

Heretic’s

Baleful

Bloodseraph’s
Demonologist

Brimstoned

Nadiral

Blacksulphur
Guardian*

Watchman’s

Resolute

Steelspirit
Herald of Xotli

Dark Ember

Wildfire

Bloodseer’s
Necromancer

Eidolon’s

Voidseeker

Nihilistic
Priest of Mitra

Beatific

Resplendent

Exaltate’s
Ranger

Pathfinder

Crow Feather

Wildstrider
Tempest of Set

Zephyrous

Empyreal

Skyshear

* Note: in the case of the “guardian” sets, the transition from one set to another occurs at level 60 instead of 70. In other words, Watchman’s is available only up to level 59, whereas Resolute is available for the whole 60-80 range. This is because full-plate armor becomes available from level 60, so the alternative would be to either make some other kind of plate drops available in the 60-69 range, or to make the Watchman’s set partly heavy (in the 40-59 range) and partly plate (in the 60-69) range (which would be odd as you’d have items from the same set looking substantially different).

Many of the correspondences between sets and classes are readily obvious; for example, if you see a light armor set with melee DPS stats, you will naturally say it’s a barbarian set. But there are a few cases that are less obvious. Clearly the Beatific and Zephyrous sets are PoM/ToS sets; but how will you say which is which? In terms of stats, it seems to me that the Zephyrous set has very little to recommend itself; it has more hit rating than Beatific, but less HP and magic damage.

One possible fallback mechanism in such a case is the name itself. The PoM as a class is associated with holiness and positive divinity, whereas the ToS tends to be associated with skies, storms and lightning. Thus, Beatific is a very PoMmish name (even though I have to admit that Zephyrous isn’t a terribly ToSsish name).

Another argument is historical. As you can see from old screenshots in this thread, the Beatific set used to have holy damage (as opposed to generic magic damage), and Zephyrous used to have electrical damage. Similarly, Brimstoned used to have fire and electrical damage while Eidolon’s had cold and unholy damage, so the former is the demo set and the latter is the necro set. The above-mentioned thread unfortunately doesn’t contain screenshots with the stats of the level 70-80 sets, but I assume they similarly had stats that left one in no doubt as to which set is meant for which class.

Another argument in the case of demo/necro sets is the following, based on their stats. Throughout the game, demo sets tend to have intelligence whereas necro sets tend to have a mixture of intelligence and magic damage. You can certainly see this in the case of T1/T2/T3 raid armor sets, which are explicitly marked as class-specific in the game itself. TBH it isn’t quite obvious to me, although I have levelled both a demo and a necro, why one of these two arrangements (i.e. pure int vs. a combination of int and magic damage) should be preferable for one class and not for the other class, but it’s certainly a distinction that is maintained with some degree of consistency across many tiers (you can even see it in T4, with a pure int set (Outer Dark) and an int/magic damage set (Bone Oracle)).

For the dungeon sets, we have another way of resolving these questions, which is probably as close to “word of god” as we can get on this matter. You can go to the testlive server, roll a PoM or a ToS, and ask Fate to level you up to 80 and give you suitable armor. You can see that a PoM will get the Exaltate’s set whereas a ToS will get the Skyshear set. The demo vs. necro dilemmas can be resolved in the same way. Unfortunately this doesn’t work for the world-drop sets, because Fate doesn’t hand out those (if you ask for gear at a lower level, you get a mix of various green and blue items, none from the world-drop sets).

The original world-drop system

It would seem that in the very early days of the game, the world-drop system had somewhat different naming conventions, based on a division into six tiers, not merely two, spanning the level ranges 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-74, 75-79, and 80. (This sort of arrangement actually still exists for white and green gear, as well as for crafted gear.)

There’s a very interesting forum thread about this, dated 19 June 2008, i.e. still in the pre-release period. According to that thread, for any given class, the sets for the 40-69 range all looked the same, as did the sets for the 70-80 range, so I guess the transition to the current two-tier system was merely a matter of consolidating the names, thereby making sure that sets which look the same will also have the same name. The other details, such as which parts are tradable and which aren’t, or which parts are odd-levelled and which are even-levelled, seem to have been the same as they are now.

(Incindentally, information about these early names of the sets can also be found on the AoC wikia, a fascinating site much of which is so awesomely out of date that it’s actually very interesting for a person curious about AoC as it was in the very early stages.)

I’m not sure when exactly the renaming to the present-day two-tier system took place, but it must have been fairly early after the release as I started playing only a week after release and don’t have any memory of the earlier six-tier naming system. Perhaps this was done on 17 July 2008, as the patch notes for that day mention renaming some sets of armor.

The names of the sets were apparently meant to be as follows. We can see that the principle of a certain poetic association between the class and the names of its sets has been adhered to, and that many of the names that were dropped in the consolidation to two tiers have subsequently been recycled for other purposes (e.g. the Defiant and Dauntless sets, both mentioned in the table below as guardian sets, are now actually the names of the guardian T1 and T3 PvP sets, respectively).

Class 40-49 50-59 60-69
Assassin

Whispering

Shadowmarked

Twilight
Barbarian

Corybantic

Vicious

Fearsome
Bear Shaman

Bestial

Ferine

Wildsoul
Conqueror

Challenger

Vanguard

Vindicator
Dark Templar

Heretic’s

Sadist’s

Wicked
Demonologist

Brimstoned

Fiendish

Blackheart
Guardian

Watchmen’s

Custodian’s

Defiant
Herald of Xotli

Harbinger

Doomsayer

Dark Ember
Necromancer

Forsaken

Eidolon’s

Darkwretch
Priest of Mitra

Devotee’s

Beatific

Rapturous
Ranger

Pathfinder’s

Marksman’s

Swiftstriker
Tempest of Set

Zephyrous

Nebulous

Thunderous
Class 70-74 75-79 80
Assassin

Midnight

Darkshroud

Blackshadow
Barbarian

Ravager’s

Berserker’s

Ragereaver
Bear Shaman

Scarhide

Rendclaw

Beastfury
Conqueror

Vanquisher’s

Battlemaster’s

Exemplar’s
Dark Templar

Cruel

Baleful

Tormentor’s
Demonologist

Demonsoul

Nadiral

Abyssal
Guardian

Resolute

Dauntless

Indomitable
Herald of Xotli

Wildfire

Rageflame

Ascendant
Necromancer

Voidseeker

Soulbinder

Shadowmancer
Priest of Mitra

Resplendent

Exalted

Resplendent
Ranger

Farseeker

Ravenwing

Hawksight
Tempest of Set

Stormrager

Skyfury

Empyreal
Advertisements
Categories: Age of Conan, Gear, Vanity Gear

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: